SHIPBREAKING

A DIRTY AND DANGEROUS INDUSTRY

SHIPBREAKING

A DIRTY AND DANGEROUS INDUSTRY

SHIPBREAKING

A DIRTY AND DANGEROUS INDUSTRY

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NGO_Shipbreaking

The NGO Shipbreaking Platform is a global coalition of organisations working to reverse the environmental harm and human rights abuses caused by current shipbreaking practices and to ensure the safe and environmentally sound dismantling of end-of-life ships worldwide.

Just as the goods they transport, ships too become waste when they reach the end of their operational lives. Yet only a fraction is handled in a safe and clean manner. The vast majority of the world's end-of-life fleet, full of toxic substances, is simply broken down - by hand - on the beaches of South Asia. There, unscrupulous shipping companies exploit minimal enforcement of environmental and safety rules to maximise profits.

Ship owners from East Asia and Europe top the list of dumpers that sell ships for breaking on South Asian beaches.

In Bangladesh, India and Pakistan ships are broken apart directly on the beach instead of in an industrial site: a practice known as "beaching".

 

Since 2009:

 

8078
SHIPS BEACHED
449
DEATHS
404
INJURIES

SPOTLIGHT

The Toxic Tide – 2023 Shipbreaking Records

2023 shipbreaking records: most shipping companies continue to opt for the highest price at the worst scrapping yards.

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Bangladesh: shipping firms profit from labour abuse

A new report released by Human Rights Watch and the NGO Shipbreaking Platform uncovers the human and environmental costs of shipbreaking in Bangladesh.

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Where ships go to die – Winner of the Public Eye Investigation Award

Decommissioned deep-sea vessels are floating toxic waste. Their disposal is laborious and costly, and regarded as a menace by those who want to protect both the workers… Read More

Maersk’s toxic trade: the North Sea Producer case

In August 2016 the FPSO NORTH SEA PRODUCER was beached in Chittagong, Bangladesh. The ship was allowed to leave the UK based on false claims that it… Read More

Newsroom

Brussels, Feb 13th 2024

Press Release – Union Bay residents still fighting against hazardous shipbreaking

The infamous shipbreaking company DWR persists in scrapping vessels in blatant violation of international and national rules and standards.

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Izmir, Feb 12th 2024

Platform News – Latest report on ship recycling in Turkey presented in Izmir

Attending the event, representatives from local NGOs, unions and concerned citizens engaged in a constructive dialogue.

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Brussels, Feb 01st 2024

Press Release – Platform publishes list of ships dismantled worldwide in 2023

In 2023, 325 large tankers, bulkers, floating platforms, cargo- and passenger ships ended up for dirty and dangerous breaking on beaches in Bangladesh, India and Pakistan.

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Brussels, Jan 25th 2024

Platform publishes South Asia Quarterly Update #36

Eight workers suffered an accident on South Asian beaches in the last quarter of 2023.

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Brussels, Jan 23rd 2024

Press Release – Two workers killed at Gadani shipbreaking yards

NGOs join trade unions in calling for enforcement of occupational health and safety standards.

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Brussels, Dec 20th 2023

Press Release – Ship recycling in Aliağa under the spotlight

Our new report Ship Recycling in Turkey provides a comprehensive analysis of the current challenges faced by the ship recycling sector in Aliağa and also underscores the immense potential for driving forward sustainable practices.

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Brussels, Dec 11th 2023

Press Release – UAE takes important steps towards sustainable ship recycling

Set to take effect from June 2025, UAE new legislation brings about a ban on the beaching and landing of UAE-flagged vessels as well as all foreign vessels leaving or transiting through UAE waters enroute to scrap yards.

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Brussels, Nov 22nd 2023

Platform publishes South Asia Quarterly Update #35

Four workers suffered an accident on South Asian beaches in the third quarter of 2023.

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